Weight Loss Surgery, Gastric Bypass
   
 
   
Bridges Weight Loss Center is a comprehensive surgical weight loss clinic offering Weight loss Surgery, Gastric bypass, Gastric banding, Lapband, Realize band, Sleeve Gastrectomy in Dallas, Austin, Houston, Texas USA

  1. What should I bring with me to the hospital?
  2. How long do I have to stay in the hospital?
  3. Does Laparoscopic Surgery decrease the risk?
  4. What happens to the lower part of the stomach that is bypassed?
  5. How big will my stomach pouch be after surgery?
  6. Do I need my gallbladder removed?
  7. What is a hernia and what is the probability of an abdominal hernia after surgery?
  8. If I have a hernia will you fix it during surgery?
  9. What are the possible complications of weight loss surgery?
  10. What are the risks of developing a complication?
  11. What is the "Candida Syndrome"?
  12. What causes Candida syndrome to appear?
  13. Can Candida be cured?
  14. Is a blood transfusion required?
  15. What is deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and is it preventable?
  16. What is done to minimize the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE)?
  17. What are adhesions and do they form after this surgery?
  18. Will the doctor leave a drain in after surgery?
  19. How soon will I be able to walk?
  20. How soon can I drive?
  21. Will I have a lot of pain?
  22. What will the staples do inside my abdomen? Is it okay in the future to have an MRI test? Will I set off metal detectors in airports?
  1. What should I bring with me to the hospital?
    1. Basic toiletries (comb, toothbrush, etc.) and clothing may be provided by the hospital, but most people prefer to bring their own. Choose clothes for your stay that are loose fitting and easy to put on and take off. Please be aware that because of your incision, your clothes may become stained by blood or other body fluids. Dr. Raja also requires that patients bring their own CPAP machine (if they are using one at home) and the medications prescribed at the pre-operative visit to the hospital.
    2. Other ideas: reading and writing materials, crossword and other puzzles, personal toiletries, bathrobe, etc.
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  2. How long do I have to stay in the hospital?
    The typical in hospital stay for our patients is 1 night.
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  3. Does Laparoscopic Surgery decrease the risk?
    No. Laparoscopic operations carry the same risk as the procedure performed as an open operation. The benefits of laparoscopy are typically less discomfort, shorter hospital stay, better cosmetic outcome, earlier return to work, and reduced scarring.
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  4. What happens to the lower part of the stomach that is bypassed?
    In some surgical procedures, the stomach is left in place with intact blood supply. In some cases it may shrink a bit and its lining, the mucosa, may atrophy, but for the most part it remains unchanged. The lower stomach still contributes to the function of the intestines even though it does not receive or process food, it makes intrinsic factor, necessary to absorb Vitamin B12 and contributes to hormone balance and motility of the intestines in ways that are not entirely known. In the sleeve gastrectomy procedure, a large portion of the stomach is completely removed.
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  5. How big will my stomach pouch be after surgery?
    This can vary by surgical procedure and surgeon. In the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the stomach pouch is created at 1 ounce or less in size. In the first few months it is stiff due to natural surgical inflammation. About 6-12 months after surgery, the stomach pouch can expand and will become more expandable as swelling subsides. Many patients end up with a meal capacity of 3-6 ounces.
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  6. Do I need my gallbladder removed?
    At your initial consultation Dr. Raja will review your medical history and determine if you need an ultrasound of your gallbladder. If you are having gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy and the ultrasound is positive for gallstones your gallbladder may be removed at the same time as your weight loss surgery.
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  7. What is a hernia and what is the probability of an abdominal hernia after surgery?
    A hernia is a weakness in the muscle wall through which an organ, usually fatty tissue, can advance. Approximately 3-5% of patients develop a hernia after laparoscopic surgery. Most of these patients require a repair of the herniated tissue. The use of a reinforcing mesh to support the repair is common.
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  8. If I have a hernia will you fix it during surgery?
    Dr. Raja generally fixes any existing hernias during the surgical weight loss procedure.
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  9. What are the possible complications of weight loss surgery?
    Complications include: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, hair loss, infection, bleeding, pneumonia, DVT/PE, heart attack, kidney failure, hernia, bowel obstruction, leak, stricture, fistula, weight gain, malnutrition, death, etc.
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  10. What are the risks of developing a complication?
    The rate of complications for gastric bypass is 10-15%, for sleeve gastrectomy is 5-10%, and for adjustable gastric band is 3-10%.
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  11. What is the "Candida Syndrome?"
    Some patients have a Candida type of yeast present on the surface of their skin, intestine or vagina at the time of surgery. The use of antibiotics at the time of operation can lead to overgrowth of Candida in certain circumstances. A whitish coating may occur on the tongue or throat, also known as thrush. This syndrome is associated with a frothy mucous, nausea, difficulty swallowing, sore throat, loss of taste and appetite, and occasionally abdominal bloating and diarrhea.
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  12. What causes Candida syndrome to appear?
    It is promoted by the use of most antibiotics and some other medications, stress, reduced immune response, and diabetes.
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  13. Can Candida be cured?
    There are several effective medications now available for treating the overgrowth of Candida.
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  14. Is a blood transfusion required?
    Infrequently: If needed, it is usually given after surgery to promote healing.
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  15. What is deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and is it preventable?
    DVT is undesired blood clotting in veins, especially of the calf and pelvis. It is not completely preventable, but preventive measures will be taken, including: pulsatile boots, early ambulation, and blood thinners
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  16. What is done to minimize the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE)?
    Because a DVT originates on the operating table, therapy begins before a patient goes to the operating room. Generally, patients are treated with sequential leg compression stockings and given a blood thinner prior to surgery. Both of these therapies continue throughout your hospitalization. Dr. Raja also requires that blood thinner (Lovenox) therapy be continued for the first two weeks after the operation. The third major preventive measure involves getting the patient moving and out of bed as soon as possible after the operation to restore normal blood flow in the legs.
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  17. What are adhesions and do they form after this surgery?
    Adhesions are scar tissues formed inside the abdomen after surgery or injury. Adhesions can form with any surgery in the abdomen. For most patients, these are not extensive enough to cause problems.
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  18. Will the doctor leave a drain in after surgery?
    Very few patients will have a small tube to allow drainage of any accumulated fluids from the abdomen. Most patients will not have a nose tube, urine catheter, or any drainage tube as they awake from their operation.
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  19. How soon will I be able to walk?
    Almost immediately after surgery, the nursing staff will require you to get up and move around. Patients are asked to walk in the hallway on the day of surgery, and take several walks the next day. Upon leaving the hospital, you may be able to care for all your personal needs, but will need help with shopping, lifting and with transportation.
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  20. How soon can I drive?
    For your own safety, you should not drive until you have stopped taking narcotic pain medications and can move quickly and alertly to stop your car, especially in an emergency. Usually this takes 7-10 days after surgery.
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  21. Will I have a lot of pain?
    Every attempt is made to control pain after surgery to make it possible for you to move about quickly and become active. This helps avoid problems and speeds recovery. While you are still in the hospital, Dr. Raja may use a Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) machine that allows you to give yourself a dose of pain medicine on demand.
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  22. What will the staples do inside my abdomen? Is it okay in the future to have an MRI test? Will I set off metal detectors in airports?
    The staples used on the stomach and the intestines are very tiny in comparison to the staples you will have in your skin or staples you use in the office. Each staple is a tiny piece of stainless steel or titanium so small it is hard to see other than as a tiny bright spot. Because the metals used, titanium or stainless steel, are inert in the body, most people are not allergic to staples and they usually do not cause any long term problems. The staple materials are also non-magnetic, which means that a MRI will not affect them and they will not set off airport metal detectors.
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